Presented by CEI Group

Category: Craftsmanship

Trends that are Driving Change in the Roofing Industry

In our monthly newsletter, we have been highlighting five trends in the roofing industry that are sparking changes in how we go about roofing. The NRCA presented an article on the topic, and we decide to share with you our thoughts on the subject.

As you can see, the roofing industry is not the same as it was 50 years ago. Multiple advances have happened to the products we use, regulations for roofers, and even in the information needed for bidding. We can’t turn a blind eye to several trends that are forcing change to happen in the industry today.

Trend 1: Extreme Weather

As we experienced in 2018 and 2019, the weather is getting more unpredictable. From hurricanes and tornados to wet and rainy summers to snowy and cold winters, our weather conditions are not what they used to be. Across the broad more extreme weather is taking effect on the performance of roof systems. Hurricanes across the south boards with high winds and heavy rain are a threat. Just in Michigan, we have been experiencing tropical storms with heavy winds and shower along with the winters being below 15 degrees one day, and the next is 45 degrees and wet. High winds are the most concerning because it can pull up roof coverings and expose the roof deck to water.

These quickly changing conditions are forcing the roofing industry to take a look at the old roofing system to make the appropriate modification. The goal is to make roofs more durable and more protective to withstand the unpredictable weather.

Trend 2: Insurance Standards

With the threat from the extreme weather conditions, Insurance companies are influencing how often roof systems are replaced, the type of products that are being installed, and how they are installed on the roofs. Insurance companies are forcing building owners and contractors to install high quality performing roof systems by making better products and installation methods more attractive. Therefore there are fewer insurance claims due to damaged roofs.

“As a trend in 2020 and beyond, you can expect to see IBHS standards and others like them become more common throughout the U.S. and Canada as roofing contractors make them part of their businesses,” Jack Gottesman writes in the NRCA article.

Trend 3: Building Codes

Like insurance standards, building codes are adapting to severe weather conditions as well. State and Local governments are incentivizing more robust, weather-resistant, and efficient roof systems to protect the citizens from damage to their homes and buildings.

They are mandating roof systems that stand up to high wind, heavy rain, and snow. Along with mandating more efficient roofing materials. For example, in California, they require solar-reflective shingles to help with energy use.

Trend 4: Innovative products

With the new building code and insurance, standards come new products to meet them. The roofing materials that offer minimum protection is no longer good enough. Manufacturers are bringing forth products that provide more options. For example, products that a wind-resistant, impact-resistant, and heat-reflective shingles, helping contractors meet demands.

Beyond 2020 manufacturers are bringing new innovative products to the industry that will give contractors the ability to offer higher protection to their customers.

Trend 5: Informed Consumers

One of the most important trend that is shaping the roofing industry and other industries as well- is the fact that consumers are more informed than ever.

For multiple years we haven’t seen significant changes in the buying and selling process of roof systems. During those days, building owners had little knowledge of roofing products and even less interest in them; they simply relied on the contractors. Nowadays, consumers can’t help but be more informed on what products are higher quality and the methods used for installing the roofing systems. With media blowing up everywhere, consumers now are better educated, savvier, and more skeptical.

Back then, consumers were buying the contractors, not the material brands. But consumers are barraged with information on weather conditions, natural disasters, and how to save a few bucks. So the bottom line when it comes down to their roofs, they are going to do some research before making a purchasing decision.

This forces contractors to be informed of the trends in the industry and to make better decisions on their methods and products that are being used or that they recommend.

Despite these constant changes with the industry, one thing has stayed the same: Good looking roofs. Although these trends may be a burden on contractors at first, they are necessary to continue to keep people safe and keeping the building looking good.

Firestone’s 2019 Partner in Quality

Firestone has recognized CEI for our outstanding efforts in quality roofing installations.

The Partner in Quality award is presented to contractors who achieved the highest levels of roofing quality by meeting or exceeding the following criteria during the previous year:

  1. Install at least eight warranted Firestone roofs in 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, and 2018
  2. Maintain at least million square feet of Firestone roofs under warranty
  3. Achieve an annual QIR of 1.0 or less

The Quality Incidence Rating (QIR) offers a simple but compelling tool to promote roofing quality. Firestone has recognized our high-quality standards and rewarded us with a plaque for our achievement as a 2019Partner inQuality.

About CEI

CEI Group has earned a reputation as one of the country’s most progressive roofing firms. They pioneered single ply roofs in the late 70’s and 80’s, were one of the first roofing companies to maintain their own sheet metal shop, and today, they are leading the way in green roofing projects, sheet metal,  and composite wall panel projects.

As a union-shop, CEI is also known for their trade craftsmanship. Some of the lost art and techniques for working on architecturally-challenging or historical elements have been preserved and passed down from veteran roofing pros.

CEI customers appreciate the company’s disciplined project management, communication during the project, and ability to consistently meet challenging deadlines.

“We take the stress and uncertainty out of your toughest roofing challenges.” Eric Cook, President, CEI Group

Founded: 1969

Focus: Challenging Commercial Roofing Projects

Specialties: University & Historical Roofs, Slate Roofs, Multi-Level/Multi-Roof System Projects, International Government Work

Services: Leak Hunting & Repair, Extended Roof-Life Service Agreements, Coatings, Waterproofing

2018 Michigan Historical Preservation Award

A CEI sheet metal project was honored with the 2018 Michigan Historical Preservation Award. CEI along with the rest of the teams on the restoration project were all presented with the award at the end of March. The specific award given to the project was the Preservation Gem Award.  This award is given to completed projects within the last three years that focused on restoring one element of a building. This meaning the entire building is not being restored at the same time. CEI was a project participant on the restoration of the copper lanterns at University of Michigan’s West Hall. CEI worked hard to recreate the Lanterns at their in-house sheet metal shop and then installed them on-site.

MHPN featured the honorees on their facebook page last week.

They wrote,

“Today’s featured award is the West Hall Lantern Restoration, winner of a 2018 Preservation Gem Award. The lanterns marking the Denison Archway on the Albert Kahn-designed West Hall are one of the most prominent landmarks on the University of Michigan campus, ushering students onto the historic Diag since 1904. The copper-clad lanterns had suffered from weathering over the years, making restoration a priority for the University. The original copper cladding was carefully removed, restored, and re-installed over reconstructed and structurally strengthened framing, ensuring the longevity of these iconic lanterns. The restoration of the West Hall Lanterns is a fitting example of a building owner making the investment in a building to preserve its aesthetic and historic character for future generations.

Project team:

Owner: University of Michigan
Engineer: Simpson Gumpertz & Heger, Inc.
General Contractor: Krull Construction
Sheet Metal Fabricator and Installer: CEI Group Michigan”

Project Spotlight: Biological Science Building

The Biological Science Building (BSB) located in Ann Arbor is one of the most unique roofing and sheet metal projects in CEI’s history. Started in 2016, the project has taken well over a year and is still being actively worked on. The 300,000 gross square foot building, will be used for a variety of student resources including research laboratories, classrooms, vivarium services, and the four museums. It also has connections to the current Life Sciences Building.

The project included new construction of a hot rubber roof, fully tapered and fully adhered with reinforced rubber. The second half was a sheet metal dome. As seen in the pictures the dome was created with galvanized 90 degreed marine grade plywood and 22gage bronzed stainless steel.

“I was ecstatic to have received the opportunity to apply myself in such a manner and thankful. Also relieved that I was able to accomplish the task of roofing an igloo in the middle of winter.” -Bill Ryan, Sheet Metal Foreman

 

Project Spotlight: Ford Fairlane Town Center

The Fairlane Town Center is a located in Dearborn, MI. The former mall has been converted to office spaces for Ford Motor Company while they begin work on their 10-year project for two large campus headquarters. The Fairlane building was in need of small renovations of canopies over multiple entrances. CEI bid the Fairlane project in 2017 and have been working hard at it since.

A smaller project in size, it involves work only on a few entrance canopies. Each canopy involves interior and exterior composite wall panels with a small section of TPO roof on the top. The project is a big one for CEI because it is the first project that CEI is crafting there own composite panels. Over the course of 2017, CEI has been piecing together a composite panel shop. This adds a huge new division to CEI existing sheet metal shop. Ford Fairlane is the putting this new shop to work and the results are fantastic.

Project Spotlight: Detroit Observatory

One of the oldest buildings in Ann Arbor, the Detroit Observatory was built in 1852.

At that time it was outside of campus and city limits of Ann Arbor. As the city has grown it has encompassed the Observatory. It is one of the oldest observatories of its kind. CEI has been put to the test of restoring this amazing piece of architecture. The dome that is the highlight of the building is quite
the statement piece on its own. Adding to that statement is a new zinc-coated copper roof covering the dome. The dome has put CEI to the test and given them an excellent project to showcase there craftsmanship, attention to detail and skills when it comes to working with historical restorations.

 

 

 

Detroit Observatory- New Sheet Metal Roof

Related image

Detroit Observatory Dome- Before

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sheet Metal Shop Auction Gift

We are always saying how much talent and true craftsmanship we have in our crews, especially in the sheet metal shop. Here is proof of how much talent they really have. Created out of copper, this gift box was hand crafted by our sheet metal shop supervisor Bob Gardner. The box is being donated as an auction item to Mt. Brighton’s XLR8 Alpine Race Team’s annual golf outing. Bob has made many of these boxes, each one a little different. This is his very first pair of skis that he added!

© 2020 Roofer Madness

Theme by Anders NorenUp ↑